• Mt. Hood Community College Planetarium Presents “26 years of Breathtaking Hubble Images” in April

    Gresham, Ore. – Its already been more than a quarter century since the $2.5 billion Hubble telescope took its place in orbit around the earth, but it continues to provide groundbreaking images of the universe that have helped astronomers around the globe – and delighted the rest of us with amazing and breathtaking pictures. Now coming up on its third decade of service, the Hubble telescope has become one of the most productive scientific instruments ever built.

    Looking like a caterpillar, Hubble imaged this very early version of a star as gravity is pulling gas and dust into the central new forming star.
    Looking like a caterpillar, Hubble imaged this very early version of a
    star as gravity is pulling gas and dust into the central new forming star.

    In the upcoming April planetarium shows, Mt. Hood Community College professor Pat Hanrahan will take a look at some of that incredible collection during “26 years of Breathtaking Hubble Images.” Mr. Hanrahan will be showing off some of the best and some of the latest Hubble images that he has found in the Hubble archive while discussing the meaning behind each picture. Each of these pictures has a unique story, and touches on a variety of astronomical phenomenon such as different stages of star evolution, star death, very distant galaxies, and even close-up pictures of planets.

    “26 Years” will take place on Tuesday, April 5 and Thursday, April 14. Show times on each date are at 6:00 pm and 7:15 pm.

    At the MHCC planetarium, visitors are encouraged to ask questions during each 45-minute live program. Admission for the general public is $5 and $2 for children (17 and younger) and for MHCC students (identification required). Seating is limited and is on a first come/first serve basis so early arrival is suggested. The planetarium is wheelchair accessible.

    Remaining planetarium shows for this season include:
    May 3 and 12, 2016: “A Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun; Mars at its Closest Too!”
    June 2 and 7, 2016: “Brave New Worlds Update (Pluto, Ceres, and comet 67p)”

    The planetarium is located on the Gresham Campus beneath the library at 26000 S.E. Stark Street. Campus parking is free. Private shows for groups are also available on Fridays. For more information about the planetarium visit www.mhcc.edu/planetarium.

    The relatively young star cluster shown in the upper right of this picture contains some of the most massive and hottest stars in our galaxy
    The relatively young star cluster shown in the upper right of this picture contains some of the most massive and hottest stars in our galaxy